Frequently Asked Questions about the Race

The Victoria to Peak (VTP) Challenge is a 10k race from the Central Pier 9 (next to Star Ferry) in Central to the Peak.

  1. What level of fitness do I have to be to run in VTP?
  2. Is there an entry fee, and what does it entitle me to?
  3. Do I have to memorise the race route?
  4. Will there be water stations along the race route?
  5. Is there a cut-off time to complete the race?
  6. What happens if I don't make it to the next water station within the time needed?
  7. What will happen if I can't complete the race?
  8. Will the race route be cordoned off to traffic?
  9. What do I need to bring with me to the race?
  10. What breakfast will be provided?
  11. What's the likelihood of the race being called off because of the weather?
  12. What are some of the attractions along the race route?
  13. How do I sign up for the race?
1) What level of fitness do I have to be to run in VTP?

VTP is open to runners who are physically fit and beyond the beginner's stage as a runner as the course is relatively demanding with over 400 metres of elevation gain. This is a demanding course and those who are not physically fit must not participate.

2) Is there an entry fee, and what does it entitle me to?

The non-refundable entry fee is HK $390 per individual It entitles participants to a post-race breakfast at The Peak Lookout, a commemorative towel, drinks en-route and logistical costs. It also includes breakfast subsidies for volunteers. For runners in individual categories not joining the breakfast, the entry fee is HK$270, the entry fee for family not joining the breakfast, the entry fee is HK$540

3) Do I have to memorise the race route?

No. There will be race marshals posted along the race route to point runners in the right direction. But it is recommended that you review the route map and video demonstration available on our website in advance.

4) Will there be water stations along the race route?

Yes. Three first-aid and water stations are available en route at about 3k intervals at Bowen Road, Hornsey Road and Barker Road.

5) Is there a cut-off time to complete the race?

Yes, the cut-off time to complete the entire race is 2 hours. However, there are also cut-off times for each water station:

Water station #1 (Bowen Road): 8:45am
Water station #2 (Hornsey Road): 9:15am
Water station #3 (Barker Road): 9:30am

6) What happens if I don't make it to the next station within the time needed?

We recommend taking public transportation to join fellow runners for the breakfast! Don't worry, your participation is effort enough!

7) What will happen if I can't complete the race?

You will still be eligible for the towel and of course the breakfast, which closes at 11am.

8) Will the race route be cordoned off to traffic?

The race route is not closed to members of the public and involves crossing roads used by vehicles. All runners are expected to observe traffic signals and rules, follow the directions of police and race officials and show consideration to others. Runners are responsible for their own safety.

9) What do I need to bring with me to the race?

Runners should PRINT OUT AND BRING THEIR CONFIRMATION EMAILS.

You can also bring a small bag to put all your personal belongings e.g. change of clothes etc. VTP organizers will provide storage for your personal belongings and transport them to the finish line for collection immediately after the race. The organizers will make every effort to ensure tight security but cannot be held responsible for damage or missing items. You are therefore advised against leaving any valuables in storage.

Drinks will be provided at three water stations intervals along the race route.

Please bring some spare change for public transport in the event you decide to stop midway and join the breakfast.

10) What breakfast will be provided?

Runners who paid the breakfast fee, will be given a breakfast coupon, which they can redeem for a hearty buffet style breakfast at Peak Lookout. Breakfast will be available until 11am.

11) What's the likelihood of the race being called off because of the weather?

In the event of Red, Black Rainstorm, Thunderstorm or T8 warning is either hoisted or expected by 6am on race day, the event may be cancelled. Event entry fees will not be refunded. Participants will be informed by email should the race event be rescheduled to another date.

12) What are some of the attractions along the race route?

The VTP race route will take runners past some of Hong Kong's most historical and famous landmarks such as the Legislative Council Building, Rawlinson House in Hong Kong Park and the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Please check out some of the landmarks described on our home page or watch the video route demonstration.

13) How do I sign up for the race?

Please click for online registration Victoria to Peak Challenge 2016

 


Click to enlarge map
10th Victoria to Peak Challenge, October 1, 2017
VTP is a 10km race that has been described as one-of-a-kind, challenging, scenic, fun and family-oriented. Run past historical sites (below) and enjoy breakfast with your family and new friends at the Peak after the race!
Start: Star Ferry
The Star Ferry traces its origins to 1880 when Dorabjee Naorojee Mithaiwala, a Parsee cook, embarked on a new vocation and began a ferry service across Victoria Harbour with his steamboat, the Morning Star. The ferry crossing has been recognised as one of 50 places of a lifetime by The National Geographic Traveler.
The Cenotaph at Statue Square
The Cenotaph was erected in remembrance for those who sacrificed their lives in the First World War and the Second World War.
Legislative Council Building
Formerly the home of the Supreme Court until 1985, the neo-classical style Legislative Council Building was built on reclaimed land, and opened on 15 January 1912. Because of its former role, the building features a statue of “Justice,” represented by the Greek goddess, Themis, who is blindfolded and holds a scale.
Chater Garden
Named after Sir Paul Chater, Chater Garden was developed in the 1970s on land left by the Hong Kong Cricket Club. Due to its proximity to the Legislative Council Building, the garden is a popular location for political rallies and demonstrations.
St. John’s Cathedral
St. John's Cathedral is the oldest surviving Western ecclesiastical building in Hong Kong and is believed to be the oldest Anglican place of worship in the Far East. Built in a style adopted from both the 13th-Century "Early English" and "Decorated Gothic", its construction was completed in 1849.
Peak Tram Terminal (St John’s Building)
Opened in 1888, the lower Peak Tram terminus is situated underneath the St John’s Building. This is where the famous 1.4 kilometre funicular railway starts its trek from the Central district to the Victoria Peak.
Hong Kong Park - Rawlinson House
Rawlinson House was built in the early 20th century as the home of the Deputy Commander of the British Forces in the old Victoria Barracks. The Victoria Barracks were demolished in the 1980s and redeveloped into the present Hong Kong Park. Rawlinson House is presently being used as a marriage registry.
Museum of Tea Ware & The K.S. Lo Gallery (Flagstaff House)
Built in the 1840s, Flagstaff House originally served as the office and residence of the Commander of the British Forces in Hong Kong. It was converted to the Museum of Tea Ware in 1984, with a new wing, The K.S. Lo Gallery, added in 1995.
Hong Kong Zoological & Botanical Gardens
Located on the north slope of Victoria Peak, Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Gardens is one of the oldest zoological and botanical gardens on this planet. It houses more than 1000 species of vegetation, where most of the plants are from the tropical and sub-tropical regions.
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
This Gothic inspired cathedral is an imposing building in a cruciform shape, with a tower at the intersection. Construction started in 1883 and the first services began in July 1886 under the auspices of the Apostolic Vicar Dominic Pozzoni.
Central Green Trail, Chatham Path
Central Green Trail runs adjacent to the tramline, from the Peak Tram Station on Garden Road up to Barker Road. It also features an isolated colonial-style residence on No. 1 Chatham Path, that features fireplaces in all reception rooms, ornate plaster work and soaring decorative columns.
End: Peak Tram
In 1881, Alexander Findlay Smith, who owned a hotel on the Peak, petitioned for the right to introduce a funicular railway to Hong Kong. Considered a revolutionary new form of transport in Asia then, the Peak Tram took three years to build, as much of the heavy equipment and rails had to be manually hauled uphill by workers. The current tram system was built in 1989.
Back
Star Ferry The Cenotaph at Statue Square Legislative Council Building Chater Garden St. John’s Cathedral Peak Tram Terminal (St John’s Building) Hong Kong Park - Rawlinson House Museum of Tea Ware & The K.S. Lo Gallery (Flagstaff House) Hong Kong Zoological & Botanical Gardens Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Central Green Trail, Chatham Path Peak Tram
Next
VTP Route Map
Mouse over to see details